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challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking
and the environment without talking about the economy. because it's job withs, it's growth -- it's jobs, it's growth, a nation's competitive position in the world. and so these issues are interrelated. and as my friends who are here representing their country, their people in america's capital tonight, they understand this, and they understand that the great global issues facing us all -- all 6.5 billion people on the face of the earth today -- are, in fact, global. we live in a global community. that global community is underpinned by a global economy. and so whatever framework of challenges you think we face, they are international. proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the environment, energy, terrorism, extremism and maybe the most insidious of all, despair. and within the framework of despair comes hunger and poverty and when man is without dignity, not much else matters. we know that. and there'll be a consequence. the human condition always drives the e events of history. the human condition will always dictate in the end how the world will respond to a challenge. i quote at the begin
and says that to improve the economy, we need to opt pure free-market policies. it is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it is a pleasure to be here. i would like to congratulate heritage on the success that they have had. we did it. this is a pattern we have going forward and the purpose is to talk about my book, which is "the financial crisis and the free market cure." people ask me my i wrote the book. the basic answer is i thought it would be interesting to have somebody who knew what he was talking about write about thinking. because if you look to the academics to some degree, they don't know what they are talking about. [laughter] i think it's very important to undo a myth. these myths become destructive. the method they created is that it was caused by the deregulation on wall street. welcome to the simple fact is that this was not deregulated. we have the privacy act and we were mis-regulated, not deregulated. i have been working with wall street for 40 years and it's not like some grief swept out of the north. that is nothing new or different. in my book i talk about
like other sectors of the economy. david grew up in new york outside of new york city in the nassau county is father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a master's at in my youth and became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front-row seat which is something we might hear more of in the q&a. then he got involved in television and he is the ceo of the game show network who came in very late in life because of the strategy and the cover story in the land to magazine called health care killed his father and that turned into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book that i encourage all of you to buy and there are copies outside. i'm also instructed to say the next season of american bible challenge in the game show network highest rated show is coming on in a few weeks we're giving them a plug to so please join me in welcoming david goldhill. [applause] >> thank you. i am sure that everyone here reads your blog. thank you for that and for the introduction today and everybody for coming. i am here because
economy. in addition, construction which is their competitive. you try that manufacturing wages, which we did with this artificial construction boom in miniature of millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places they can have china and initially people in india and china didn't know how to do the work while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs back. they make a mistake of that magnitude. markets are constantly making this tape and correction processes, but they never make the mistake of that magnitude. it takes government policy to create that the state. in this case a three bit culprits, the fdic in government housing policy. a fundamental context are the root cause argued made by the federal reserve. something many people know, but don't get what it means. in 1913 the federal reserve is created, the monetary system is nationalized. there is no private monetary system. if you have problems in the monetary system, what this financial crisis is about, by definition the government policy profits. it's the other state highway bridges are falling down from me say that bri
to be a great optimistic since. we have lot of serious problems. in the economy and has been stripped of its industrial base and facing international competition. the environmental problems. all these, where is our sense of confidence had weakened secco this together in the history of this and the bonds of it. across the lines of the-which is the essence of patriotism. that's what democracy is. in this instance, that is of more and live the king and the movement were doing, confronting systems that the nine people and natural strengths that benefit everyone and subjugate people and figuring airways of reproductive to set in motion these freedoms of strength and everyone and increase the economy and the ties that bind and their comfort to sit here tonight. and we need to do it again. in order to do have a half to a better sense of history because our history is not just among our people fought -- sat on buses and a quake with distant era. it's a better future and what tools are going to use and what memories are going to use in risk we're willing to take to build things to what to build stren
of the economy. david grew up in new york outside of new york city and his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a master's and became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front-row seat to fannie and freddie which is something we might hear more from him in the q&a. then he got in television and he's the ceo of the game show network and came very late in life because of his tragedy. he wrote a cover story in atlanta magazine called how health care killed his father, killed my father, and then turned that into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book that i would encourage all of you to buy. there's copies outside. i am constructive to say the next season of american bible challenge, the highest rated show is coming on a few weeks. the game show network can feel like we are not stealing its ceo and we are giving them a plug, too. please join me in welcoming david. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sure everyone here reads your blog but it is a thrill. thank you for that and for the introduction today. and everyb
world war ii economy and society. it was called the committee for economic development and it was a place where the leaders of business could hammer out their differencess on economic issues and use new techniques of public relations to promote their agenda and among the founders were the president of studebaker, the inventor of modern research and polling and and eastman kodak executive. those were the titans of industry in the 1940s. it represented industry, banks, railroads, grain traders and other corporate interests and one of their agendas was i got this quote from their publications, quote, get those boys off the farm, end of quote. they wanted to create a really cheap labor pool for industry because in 1935 there were 6.8 million farmers and 64% of the population lived in rural areas. so immediately after its formation, they started mapping out a postwar program to expand chemical intensive agriculture and to grant industrial and financial interests, of more control over producing and selling food. they had another agenda, she commodities and cheap labor. you ha
this in the '60s, now we have a lot of serious problems with an economy that's been stripped of its industrial base and facing international competition about environmental problems. we've got justice problems. we've got family problems. where is our sense of confidence that we can tackle these together, and that our strength is in the bonds that we create across the lines that divide us? which is, that's the essence of patriotism. that's what democracy is. that's what george washington was doing, and in that sense that's what martin luther king and the movement were doing. they were confronting movements that deny people their natural strength that benefit everyone, and subjugated people come and they were figuring out ways that were productive to set in motion these freedoms to strengthen everyone and increase the army and the ties that bind, after comfort to secure tonight. we need to do it again. in order to do that we have to have a better sense of our system. because our history is not just about where people sat on buses in a quaint distant era in our history is about our future and wha
people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis, where he becomes befriended by a major german-american who becomes the senator from missouri and is a newspaper publisher. he's doing everything at an extraordinary rate, which we don't do anymore, he's elected state legislature of missouri. excess speed of integration we had in the 19th century when people were coming. you can't satisfy successful and i'm shortening the story, inventing a new form of journalism. pulitzer is much like the modern-day surfer. if you go to a beach and look out on the water began with the waves are breaking, use the men and women paddling lazily surfboards. suddenly one paddles and because they perceive that undulation, is going to be the best way for the day, the others don't see it. they were tidal waves of social change that he was going to write. what were they? paper with event times and coming to cities to become commanders. remember now becoming housewives. paper was being made with such a strength that could go through printing press at high speed that it became possible to print a newspaper
the war, he was unemployed. it is hard to reinvigorate people into the economy. he ended up in st. louis where he becomes confronted by a major german american who becomes a senator from new york. joseph pulitzer enters the world of press at that point. interesting in regards to modern-day immigrants. it is that kind of speed of immigration that we had in the 19th century when people were coming. he becomes fabulously successful . and he invented a very new form of journalism. it is much like a modern-day surfer. what i mean is that if you go to a beach and look out the water beyond where the waves are breaking, men and women paddle out in the middle of the ocean. some perceive that that will be the best wave of the day, whereas others don't see it. well, in regards to joseph pulitzer, he wrote the title waves of social change. you were leaving the rural areas and come into the cities. women were making better progress. paper was being made at high speed. it became possible to print a newspaper in thousands of copies quickly. what happened was an afternoon paper that could be sold to com
into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really short in the story, in st. louis, inventing a new form of journalism. pulitzer is the modern-day surfer. if you go to a beach and look at on the water cannot be on with the waves are breaking the cnn in winning paddling was there for us, one of them paddles extraordinary speed and because they perceive the undulation is the best way the day. they don't see it. but pulitzer season-ending centura title rates of social change he was going to write pair but were they? they were becoming commuters. when they made important economic decisions in the farms were now becoming first ways. paper was being made with such strength that it would come and not clock that can go for opinion prices this high speed that it became possible to print a news
people into the economy and ends up in st. louis where he becomes befriended by a major german american who becomes a senator from missouri and a newspaper publisher. "without reservations: the cartoons of ricardo cate" pulitzer enters as the press at that point. at an extraordinary rate we don't do anymore but comparing to modern-day immigrants. within five years of his entry into the united states elected to the state legislature of missouri. that kind of speed of integration we have in the nineteenth century when people are coming. she becomes fabulously successful and i am shortening the story in st. louis as the publisher of the post-dispatch and the in new form of journalism. let me give you a comparison. ricardo cate -- pulitzer is like a modern-day search for. you go to the beach and look, water beyond where the waves are breaking you see men and women paddling lazily in their surfboard, suddenly one of them paddles with extraordinary speed because they perceive that little undulation is going to be the best wave of the day and the others don't. pulitzer in the nineteenth centur
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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